Diane, A Broad

tag: main dish

  • November 26, 2012

    This is the first meal I prepared after I arrived in Nice. One of the best things and worst things about moving is a new kitchen. Best: it’s so clean! Worst: there’s no food in it! So I ran to Monoprix and came back with the essentials (eggs, pasta, cheese, lemons, bacon, butter, and wine) and some stuff for dinner (salmon, broccoli, parsley). Because apparently, whenever I need to make a single-girl dinner, it ends up being salmon.

    Saumon en Papillote au Beurre Noisette (Salmon in Parchment with Brown Butter)

    Like many of the recipes I share with you, this one tastes and sounds fancy, but is a total cinch to make. Just wrap up all the ingredients in a paper packet and bake; that’s it. I made it for a solo dinner, but I can see making this for guests too — baking off several packets at once and opening them all up at the table, puffs of lemon-scented steam escaping from the open packets. Thankfully I had a bunch of things when I moved here, such as the best spice grinder from this reviews site, some baking essentials and most important of all the Slicers without which I probably wouldn’t be able to make salmon.

    Saumon en Papillote au Beurre Noisette (Salmon in Parchment with Brown Butter)

    You can use whatever herbs you like in the packet, and even mix it up by adding different oils, spices, and vegetables. I served my salmon with buttered pasta and steamed broccoli with parmesan, letting the juices from the packet run into the rest of the plate, imparting the pasta and vegetables with the flavors and lemon and brown butter.

    Saumon en Papillote au Beurre Noisette (Salmon in Parchment with Brown Butter)

    Continue Reading

    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 COMMENTS
  • November 22, 2012

    Say hello to one of my favorite French dishes.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

    I know it’s Thanksgiving and another piece of poultry is the last thing you want to think about, but this is special. This beautiful rosy piece of poultry is magret de canard, or duck breast. Traditionally, magret de canard is the breast from a duck raised for its liver, or foie gras, and it’s usually cooked like a steak — seared, finished with a few minutes in the oven, and served medium-rare. Making this recipe also leaves you with several big spoonfuls of sublime, thyme-and-orange scented duck fat to do with what you like.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

    It’s an impressive date-night dish, something that so terribly French¬†but so very easy. I serve it with roasted veggies and sometimes mashed potatoes, but the bistro down the street serves theirs with fried plantains and a lightly dressed salad, and that is also heavenly.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

    Continue Reading

    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 COMMENTS
  • November 17, 2012

    I know you’re all sick of pumpkin recipes by now, and you’re probably saving your last bit of pumpkin tolerance for that pie at the Thanksgiving table next week, but I have something a bit on the left end of the pumpkin spectrum for you today. Something savory and warm that doesn’t get mixed with brown sugar or topped with pecans.

    Pumpkin Shrimp Curry

    I know pumpkin shrimp curry sounds weird, but it totally works. The sweetness of the pumpkin melds with the curry powder and cumin to make a warm, slightly spicy sauce that doesn’t remind you of pumpkin pie at all. Serve it over steamed whole grains for a comforting, substantial, seasonal dinner.

    Pumpkin Shrimp Curry

    Continue Reading

    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 COMMENTS
  • October 18, 2012

    We’ve talked about braising in Coke before, and I’m still a huge fan.

    Especially after this recipe. It sounds weird if you’ve never done it before, but I promise the dish doesn’t end up tooth-achingly sweet the way Coke classic sometimes is, especially since it’s balanced by the salt from the soy sauce. The soda just lends a subtle sweetness and a slightly acidic braising liquid that penetrates the chicken and makes it tender and juicy.¬†Honestly, after making this dish, I wondered if the “secret ingredient” my grandmother used for her braises wasn’t Coke.

    And really, there’s nothing better than a hearty, one-pot braise on a cold evening, especially when that braise only took a few minutes to throw together, then perhaps a half hour of happy bubbling on the stove.

    Continue Reading

    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 COMMENTS