Diane, A Broad

tag: orange

  • November 22, 2012

    Say hello to one of my favorite French dishes.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

    I know it’s Thanksgiving and another piece of poultry is the last thing you want to think about, but this is special. This beautiful rosy piece of poultry is magret de canard, or duck breast. Traditionally, magret de canard is the breast from a duck raised for its liver, or foie gras, and it’s usually cooked like a steak — seared, finished with a few minutes in the oven, and served medium-rare. Making this recipe also leaves you with several big spoonfuls of sublime, thyme-and-orange scented duck fat to do with what you like.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

    It’s an impressive date-night dish, something that so terribly French┬ábut so very easy. I serve it with roasted veggies and sometimes mashed potatoes, but the bistro down the street serves theirs with fried plantains and a lightly dressed salad, and that is also heavenly.

    Magret de Canard (Seared Duck Breast with Honey, Orange, and Thyme)

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    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 COMMENTS
  • September 5, 2012

    Okay, hear me out on this one. I know that dehydrating citrus zest isn’t nearly as widely practiced or ballyhooed as, say, making stock, but it should be. Think about all that orange juice we consume. All that fresh-squeezed lemon juice going into your vinaigrettes. The limes you squeeze over guacamole and Thai food.

    Now think about how often you need lemon or lime zest for a completely different recipe, and have to go out and buy more citrus which sits in your fridge looking pale and naked after you’ve stripped it of zest.

    The best way to get around this scenario is the waste-not-want-not method: just zest your citrus any time you’re going to use it for just its juice or flesh, and let the zest try out before bottling it and saving it. One minute of extra work and no fancy dehydrator necessary; since the bits of zest are so small and oily, they’ll dry out quite well on your counter. It doesn’t have the nose-smacking pungency of the fresh stuff, but it makes up for it by working its way into dishes you’d never think to pull out a whole lemon for — but since you’ve got a bottle of the stuff there on your shelf, well, why not?

    Plus, it makes the house smell really good while it dries. Continue Reading

    Posted in: back to basics, cooking | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 5 COMMENTS