Diane, A Broad

tag: vegetables

  • July 1, 2013

    I’ve been promising my friends to post the recipe for this frittata since that first picnic on the Seine. Well after nearly two months, and many more picnics, here it is.

    Spring Picnic Frittata by Diane, A Broad (dianeabroad.com)

    This frittata is the ultimate picnic main dish. It’s substantial enough to stand in for dinner, it’s transportable, and it’s great hot, warm, or room-temperature. It’s not as fussy as a quiche. It has a ton of beautiful vegetables in it, which will make you feel virtuous, but has a bit of ham and cheese for smoke and salt.

    Spring Picnic Frittata by Diane, A Broad (dianeabroad.com)

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    Posted in: cooking, mains, party food | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 COMMENTS
  • December 13, 2012

    This is one of the most versatile dinners I know. Basically, it follows the concept of “slather it in béchamel sauce and/or top it with pie crust and it’ll probably be delicious.”

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    Originally, I was going to call this “leftover pot pie,” because I took these photos around Thanksgiving when leftovers were all everyone was talking about. And honestly, the way I usually make it is with a mess of leftovers, but leftovers pot pie doesn’t sound that appetizing.

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    My point is that you can make this pie with pretty much any kind of vegetables or protein in the filling. Got some leftover chicken from that one you roasted earlier this week? It’ll work perfectly. A few herby carrot sticks that you didn’t finish from today’s afternoon snack? Chop ‘em up and chuck ‘em in. Some garlicky greens hanging out in your fridge? Naturally. You can also make this in almost any oven-safe vessel: a deep dish pie pan is traditional, but feel free to mess with individual mini-pies (like I did), 8-inch square baking pans, or cast-iron skillets.

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    Posted in: cooking, mains | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 COMMENTS
  • August 12, 2012

    An early morning walk to and through le marché de la Bastille.

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    Posted in: paris, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 4 COMMENTS
  • August 7, 2012

    As some of you may know, I’ve been reading An Everlasting Meal: Cooking with Economy and Grace by the incredibly inspirational Tamar Adler. You may know because I cannot. Stop. Talking about it. If I know you in real life, I’ve probably told you to pick up this book. Maybe twice. It’s not only because the writing is so eloquent and personal — which it is. It’s because Adler has summed up the essence of what it is to cook, and to do it in a way that makes it feel as if everyone were born to make food, which, of course, we are.

    Which is why I’ve decided to start a new intermittent series here that I’m calling Back to Basics. These aren’t recipes; they are more like guidelines, techniques. Things you can do with the last bit of this-or-that so it ends up contributing to something delicious instead of ending up in the trash, and things you can do when you first get a batch of food home so that it’s more likely to end up in your belly in the first place. Simple fundamentals to make cooking feel more like alchemy than chemistry.

    That isn’t to say that I’m going to stop giving you the usual recipes, too — after all, if you’re craving peach pie, you can’t make it out of the odds and ends of your fridge without having to go out and get some peaches. But food bloggers and people can’t and don’t live on those glossily photographed dishes alone.

    “No, the point is not to do everything perfectly. The point is to be able to make great food with what you have.”

    And so, we come to broth.

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    Posted in: back to basics, cooking, soups | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 5 COMMENTS