Diane, A Broad

tag: wild yeast

  • April 7, 2014

    Red Bread [Los Angeles] by Diane, A Broad [dianeabroad.com]

    The first day that I walked into Red Bread was the day that the LA Times ran a photo of the newly-opened brick-and-mortar Culver City store/restaurant on the front page of the Saturday Section, along with an article praising its rye. Not being a subscriber, I did not know this, and all of the bread had been sold out by the time I stumbled in at 2pm.

    Red Bread [Los Angeles] by Diane, A Broad [dianeabroad.com]

    Red Bread [Los Angeles] by Diane, A Broad [dianeabroad.com]

    The next weekend, not being what you call an early bird, I again went in during the afternoon, but there was no loaves of┬ásourdough to be had. No matter, a loaf of Russian black bread was tucked under my arm, and I filled my belly with the best quiche I’d had since Soul Kitchen.

    Red Bread [Los Angeles] by Diane, A Broad [dianeabroad.com]

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    Posted in: dining out, los angeles, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 COMMENTS
  • December 18, 2012

    Meet the new guy I’ve been obsessing over for the last couple of weeks.

    DSC05822

    He’s a sourdough starter and I raised him myself! Back in the old days, before you could get those packets of yeast at the supermarket, bakers would have to catch and raise their own yeast if they wanted leavened bread. The cool thing is that when you catch wild yeast, some beneficial bacteria get caught too; these are the bacteria that give sourdough that tangy flavor. And the combinations of yeast and bacteria are different in every region, which is part of the reason why a French pain au levain tastes different from San Francisco sourdough.

    Raising a starter is as simple as mixing together some flour and water, then letting it sit in a warm spot for a few days. The yeast and bacteria in the air work their way into the flour and water slurry and start eating the carbohydrates in it. Then you “train” the little guy by discarding a bit, then feeding the rest with more flour and water. Eventually the culture grows, eats, and burps little carbon dioxide bubbles in a predictable manner, and that’s when it’s ready to use for baking. It really is very much like having a pet: daily feedings, a little warm corner for him to sleep in, and he has the potential to give you many years of joy.

    His name is Jean-Bapyeast. I wanted a really French name, a friend suggested Jean-Baptiste, and Edna punned it into Jean-Bapyeast. Excellent, non?

    DSC05850

    There are a lot of things you can do with a natural sourdough starter, including, of course, making bread. I’ve tried my hand at a couple of loaves but haven’t quite nailed down my perfect recipe yet. The loaf above was my first, and unfortunately it deflated a bit while I was transferring it to the baking vessel, resulting in a denser loaf than I prefer. We’ll get there, and until then, try raising a sourdough starter for yourself. There’s really nothing cooler than making tasty bread out of nothing but flour, water, salt, and some microorganisms you gathered from the air.

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    Posted in: back to basics, cooking | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 8 COMMENTS